James Kalm Rough Cut: Featuring Thomas Broadbent, "Chronicle" Exhibition



"As a longtime member of the Williamsburg arts community, James Kalm has followed the work of Thomas Broadbent for years. "Chronicle" is the latest exhibition of Tom's work and features his watercolor paintings. These pieces present a detailed depiction of birds and books and have a sharp focus realism that is related to the nature studies of Audubon and other "chroniclers" of simple things."
Thank you to James Kalm!

Holiday Event at the Front Room this Sunday!!


Another Crassly Commercial Holiday Event
Sunday December 16th!
fuse-works
Prints, Multiples, Books and Digital art
at Front Room Gallery
3pm until 8pm (open late!)

There's something for everyone including editioned works by:
David Kramer, James Leonard, Patricia Smith, Edie Nadelhaft, Serge Onnen, Luca Bertolo, Sarah Vogwill, Peter Feigenbaum, Chuck Jones, Oscar Perez, Marshall Reese & Nora Ligorano, Emily Roz, David Shapiro, Mark Strathy, Kathleen Vance and many more!

And while you're browsing these irresistible gift ideas by visual artists, you can enjoy the stiff drink that is often necessary to tolerate all the holiday cheer! Yes, refreshments will be served!

And during your visit you will be sure to enjoy Seasonal music provided by artist Mark Strathy from his collection of holiday hits. These will be played at the dizzying speed of 78 revolutions per minute, right before your eyes (and ears).


Where?:
Front Room Gallery ...where you can also see Thomas Broadbent's "Chronicle" exhibition currently on view. Small works by Front Room artists will also be available.

Thomas Broadbent "Chronicle" Exhibition Opens This Friday

Thomas Broadbent

The Front Room presents:

Thomas Broadbent

Chronicle

November 16th-December 16th
Opening: Friday November 16th 7–9

Thomas Broadbent's solo exhibition of paintings presents a series of composed situations that observe fashion and the utility of trends, from the relative meaning of dress, to the inference of status from leather bound books. Broadbent's new watercolor paintings impeccably represent scenes of positioned components that relay metaphorically meaning through the association of objects within each new work.

Broadbent’s still lives have a timeless quality, seeming relating to the turn of the century at times. His paintings of shoes, cocktail gowns, pants, and moreover, books and ledgers often incorporate prosaic birds such as chickadees and pidgons. These situational compositions have an uncanny presence, that seems to exist somehow here and there, past present and future.

Broadbent's inherent sense of light, tone and pallet heighten the perceived reality of his compositions. Scale shifts, fusion of objects and delusive structures place the viewers themselves within the framework of each painting. The scope of Broadbent's new series ranges from introspective commentaries to universal truths; the works in "Chronicle" capture the essence of our current place in time, personal desires, implied status of objects, and implications of a future utility for those items represented. Thomas Broadbent

Williamsburg Every Second Friday, This Friday!



Williamsburg Every Second Friday

Friday, November 9th 7-9 Ballot Show Post Election Reception




The Ballot Show
EXTENDED THROUGH NOVEMBER 11TH

Featuring works by:
Wayne Adams, Julia Whitney Barnes, Thomas Broadbent, Ken Butler, Ethan Crenson, Steven Gagnon, Hubert Dobler, Robert Egert, Peter Fox, Enrico Gomez, Gregory de la Haba, Eric Heist, Kim Holleman, Lori Korchek/Mike Bade, Jesse Lambert, Jason Clay Lewis, Stephen Mallon, Sascha Mallon, Karen Marston, Mark Masyga, Geoffrey Owen Miller, Rob de Oude, Ross Racine, Marshall Reese/Nora Ligorano, Daniel Rosenbaum, Emily Roz, David Shapiro, Mark Stilwell, Savannah Spirit, Rodger Stevens, Miho Suzuki, Cibele Viera, Larry Walczak, and more. 


Ligorano/reese   The Front Room Gallery is proud to present the third quadrennial “Ballot Show”, which focuses on the American electoral system, and the overall notion of voting with a ballot. “The Ballot Show,” held every 4 years since 2004, is inspired by the American election, and contemplates our antiquated electoral-college voting process.


Ballot Show
Historically political art has often been associated with repression. This exhibition, however, is motivated by the idea of making a choice, and what it that choice represents.Steven Gagnon’s diptych, “Hope” and “Progress”, parody the famous Shephard Fairey portrait of President Obama, and feature an unopened six-pack of the hipster beer, Pabst Blue Ribbon, as one component and the following serigraph image of the cans empty and smashed. Jason Clay Lewis’sneon sign “Inner Peace $100, Blow Jobs $20” is about a more basic choice.

Many of the artists in this show have gone outside of their wheelhouse to create works specifically for this show. Ethan Crenson presented a performance at the opening in which he tattooed people with their party affiliation on their hands knuckles a la “Knight of the Hunter”. Kim Holleman's piece is an installed work and a point of sale purchase for Presidential Lottery Tickets. Holleman made the designs and printed them on actual lottery tickets. Complete with Presidential Foil Seals on them, and signed to make them, "official". Holleman's ballot lottery is a commentary on buying elections, and how "the candidate that spends the most money, has the best chance of winning the grand prize".

Emily RozVeteran political artists Marshall Reese and Nora Ligorano's video of a cast ice sculpture "Melting Middle Class" might be chilling, and it might be true. With AMERICA for PRESIDENT, Lori Korchek and Mike Badehave been traveling across the country with a replica of the Oval Office desk, asking Americans to take a seat as Commander in Chief and tell them "what good they would do for America;" The will have the actual desk as part of performance/installation with the video in the gallery.Emily Roz’s polaroid grids of actors portraying The President in Hollywood movies leave us with the impression that "Presidential" might just be a look.

During this time of overt partisanship “The Ballot Show” is not about looking at the candidates, it is about looking at the system that created them, and us.

Election Night Party/Screening

Join us Election Night for a celebration of the Democratic Process in Full Swing. We will be presenting live coverage as polls close on election night. 

The "Ballot Show" has been extended through November 11th, with special presentations on Tuesday as we anxiously await the results!

Election night party/Screening  Tuesday, November 6th, 8pm-Decision

The Ballot Show

October 25th–EXTENDED THROUGH NOVEMBER 11th

Kim HollemanFeaturing works by:
Wayne Adams, Julia Whitney Barnes, Thomas Broadbent, Ken Butler, Ethan Crenson, Steven Gagnon, Hubert Dobler, Robert Egert, Peter Fox, Enrico Gomez, Gregory de la Haba, Eric Heist, Kim Holleman, Lori Korchek/Mike Bade, Jesse Lambert, Jason Clay Lewis, Stephen Mallon, Sascha Mallon, Karen Marston, Mark Masyga, Geoffrey Owen Miller, Rob de Oude, Ross Racine, Marshall Reese/Nora Ligorano, Daniel Rosenbaum, Emily Roz, David Shapiro, Mark Stilwell, Savannah Spirit, Rodger Stevens, Miho Suzuki, Cibele Viera, Larry Walczak, and more. 


Ligorano/reese   The Front Room Gallery is proud to present the third quadrennial “Ballot Show”, which focuses on the American electoral system, and the overall notion of voting with a ballot. “The Ballot Show,” held every 4 years since 2004, is inspired by the American election, and contemplates our antiquated electoral-college voting process.

Ballot Show
Historically political art has often been associated with repression. This exhibition, however, is motivated by the idea of making a choice, and what it that choice represents.Steven Gagnon’s diptych, “Hope” and “Progress”, parody the famous Shephard Fairey portrait of President Obama, and feature an unopened six-pack of the hipster beer, Pabst Blue Ribbon, as one component and the following serigraph image of the cans empty and smashed. Jason Clay Lewis’sneon sign “Inner Peace $100, Blow Jobs $20” is about a more basic choice.

Many of the artists in this show have gone outside of their wheelhouse to create works specifically for this show. Ethan Crenson presented a performance at the opening in which he tattooed people with their party affiliation on their hands knuckles a la “Knight of the Hunter”. Kim Holleman's piece is an installed work and a point of sale purchase for Presidential Lottery Tickets. Holleman made the designs and printed them on actual lottery tickets. Complete with Presidential Foil Seals on them, and signed to make them, "official". Holleman's ballot lottery is a commentary on buying elections, and how "the candidate that spends the most money, has the best chance of winning the grand prize".

Emily RozVeteran political artists Marshall Reese and Nora Ligorano's video of a cast ice sculpture "Melting Middle Class" might be chilling, and it might be true. With AMERICA for PRESIDENT, Lori Korchek and Mike Badehave been traveling across the country with a replica of the Oval Office desk, asking Americans to take a seat as Commander in Chief and tell them "what good they would do for America;" The will have the actual desk as part of performance/installation with the video in the gallery.Emily Roz’s polaroid grids of actors portraying The President in Hollywood movies leave us with the impression that "Presidential" might just be a look.

During this time of overt partisanship “The Ballot Show” is not about looking at the candidates, it is about looking at the system that created them, and us.

"The Ballot Show" Opens This Thursday


Ballot ShowKim Holleman

The Front Room presents, The 3rd Quadrennial:

The Ballot Show

October 25th–November 6th
Opening: Thurs Oct 25th 7–9


Featuring works by:
Wayne Adams, Daniel Aycock, Julia Whitney Barnes, Thomas Broadbent, Ken Butler, Ethan Crenson, Steven Gagnon, Hubert Dobler, Robert Egert, Peter Fox, Enrico Gomez, Gregory de la Haba, Eric Heist, Kim Holleman, Lori Korchek/Mike Bade, Jesse Lambert, Jason Clay Lewis, Stephen Mallon, Sascha Mallon, Karen Marston, Mark Masyga, Geoffrey Owen Miller, Rob de Oude, Ross Racine, Ellen Rand, Marshall Reese/Nora Ligorano, Daniel Rosenbaum, Emily Roz, David Shapiro, Mark Stilwell, Savannah Spirit, Rodger Stevens, Miho Suzuki, Kathleen Vance, Cibele Viera, Larry Walczak, and more.


Ligorano/reese   The Front Room Gallery is proud to present the third quadrennial “Ballot Show”, which focuses on the American electoral system, and the overall notion of voting with a ballot. “The Ballot Show,” held every 4 years since 2004, is inspired by the American election, and contemplates our antiquated electoral-college voting process.

Historically political art has often been associated with repression. This exhibition, however, is motivated by the idea of making a choice, and what it that choice represents.Steven Gagnon’s diptych, “Hope” and “Progress”, parody the famous Shephard Fairey portrait of President Obama, and feature an unopened six-pack of the hipster beer, Pabst Blue Ribbon, as one component and the following serigraph image of the cans empty and smashed. Jason Clay Lewis’sneon sign “Inner Peace $100, Blow Jobs $20” is about a more basic choice.

Many of the artists in this show have gone outside of their wheelhouse to create works specifically for this show. Ethan Crenson will be doing a performance at the opening in which he will tattoo people with their party affiliation on their hands knuckles a la “Knight of the Hunter”. Kim Holleman's piece is an installed work and a point of sale purchase for Presidential Lottery Tickets. Holleman made the designs and printed them on actual lottery tickets. Complete with Presidential Foil Seals on them, and signed to make them, "official". Holleman's ballot lottery is a commentary on buying elections, and how "the candidate that spends the most money, has the best chance of winning the grand prize".

Emily RozVeteran political artists Marshall Reese and Nora Ligorano's video of a cast ice sculpture "Melting Middle Class" might be chilling, and it might be true. With AMERICA for PRESIDENT, Lori Korchek and Mike Badehave been traveling across the country with a replica of the Oval Office desk, asking Americans to take a seat as Commander in Chief and tell them "what good they would do for America;" The will have the actual desk as part of performance/installation with the video in the gallery.Emily Roz’s polaroid grids of actors portraying The President in Hollywood movies leave us with the impression that "Presidential" might just be a look.

During this time of overt partisanship “The Ballot Show” is not about looking at the candidates, it is about looking at the system that created them, and us. 

The Ballot Show Opens Thursday, October 25th


Ballot Show


The Front Room presents,
The 3rd Quadrennial:


The Ballot Show







October 25th–November 6th  

Opening: Thursday,  October 25th 7–9

Featuring works by:
Wayne Adams, Daniel Aycock, Julia Whitney Barnes, Ken Butler, Ethan Crenson, Steven Gagnon, Hubert Dobler, Robert Egert, Peter Fox, Enrico Gomez, Gregory de la Haba, Kim Holleman, Lori Korchek/Mike Bade, Jesse Lambert, Jason Clay Lewis, Stephen Mallon, Sascha Mallon, Karen Marston, Mark Masyga, Geoffrey Owen Miller, Rob de Oude, Ross Racine, Ellen Rand, Marshall Reese/Nora Ligorano, Daniel Rosenbaum, Emily Roz, David Shapiro, Mark Stilwell, Savannah Spirit, Rodger Stevens, Miho Suzuki, Kathleen Vance, Cibele Viera, Larry Walczak, and more.


The Front Room Gallery is proud to present the third quadrennial “Ballot Show”, which focuses on the American electoral system, and the overall notion of voting with a ballot. “The Ballot Show,” held every 4 years since 2004, is inspired by the American election, and contemplates our antiquated electoral-college voting process.

Historically political art has often been associated with repression. This exhibition, however, is motivated by the idea of making a choice, and what it that choice represents. Steven Gagnon’s diptych, “Hope” and “Progress”, parody the famous Shephard Fairey portrait of President Obama, and feature an unopened six-pack of the hipster beer, Pabst Blue Ribbon, as one component and the following serigraph image of the cans empty and smashed. Jason Clay Lewis’s neon sign “Inner Peace $100, Blow Jobs $20” is about a more basic choice.

Many of the artists in this show have gone outside of their wheelhouse to create works specifically for this show. Ethan Crenson will be doing a performance at the opening in which he will tattoo people with their party affiliation on their hands knuckles a la “Knight of the Hunter”.

Emily RozVeteran political artists Marshall Reese and Nora Ligorano's video of a cast ice sculpture "Melting Middle Class" might be chilling, and it might be true. With AMERICA for PRESIDENT, Lori Korchek and Mike Bade have been traveling across the country with a replica of the Oval Office desk, asking Americans to take a seat as Commander in Chief and tell them "what good they would do for America.;" The will have the actual desk as part of performance/installation with the video in the gallery. Emily Roz’s polaroid grids of actors portraying The President in Hollywood movies leave us with the impression that "Presidential" might just be a look.

During this time of overt partisanship “The Ballot Show” is not about looking at the candidates, it is about looking at the system that created them, and us.


“Territorial Re-Marks”



Montreal/Brooklyn Exchange with articule gallery

Brooklyn/Montreal Exchange
Exhibition in Montréal : October 19 – November 25, 2012


Opening reception : October 19, 6pm

Exhibition in Brooklyn : January 11 – February 3, 2013 
The exhibition “Territorial Re-Marks” will feature works by Front Room artists Emily Roz and Patricia Smith in conjunction with Articule artists jérôme havre, michelle lacombe.



As part of the project Montréal-Brooklyn organised in collaboration with : Parker’s Box, Momenta Art, Pierogi, Smack Mellon, Front Room Gallery, A.I.R Gallery, Causey Contemporary, Residency Unlimited & Interstate Projects, Centre CLARK, articule, Optica, Les Territoires, Galerie [SAS], Galerie de l’UQAM, MACM, Galerie Division.



The first major artistic and cultural exchange between Montreal and New York City in over 10 years, Montreal – Brooklyn will reveal cultural similarities and differences between two major cities and beacons of North American contemporary art, via a series of exhibitions in galleries and museums in both cities.



For this exchange, artist-run center articule and The Front Room Gallery collaborate to organize an exhibition that will be presented in both Montréal in and Brooklyn. This exchange was developed as an occasion for both organizations to explore and share each other’s concepts about art, artists, the working styles and cultural variances between the two cities. The concept of the exhibition, “Territorial Re-Marks” grew from this exchange and became the focus for the curation of representative artists and artworks from Brooklyn and Montréal. Artists were selected whose work deals with the idea of territory: territory of the mind, territory of the body, territory of societies, territory of wilderness. By presenting a range of working styles from performance to painting, drawing and sculpture, each artist explores the complexities of desire, social organization, hierarchy, and mark-making relative to the various forms of territories. 
Michelle Lacombe
With, Where we touched; A drawing of places to meet authors, Michelle Lacombe explores the encounter between author and reader and the way one contributes to shaping the mind of the other. In a performative action, Michelle Lacombe will translate onto a wall, marks she made to emphasize important passages while she was reading. By reenacting the action of underlining, she will be tracing a horizon of the mind.
Patricia Smith
In Plot Plans for an Ideal City, Patricia Smith proposes un-realistic plans for city developments that will never be realized. Drawing delicate psychological maps, she uses the movement of desire to prescribe domains, territories and unattainable plot plans. Patricia Smith's map-like drawings reflect how inner architecture can constrain our action in society.
Emily Roz
Emily Roz paints territories in which wilderness and domestic domains intertwine. Wild animals act ferociously – feeding upon each other, fighting, and roaring – in luxurious domestic flora. Their instincts of survival and territorial control can be viewed as human actions in relation to the space they share, competing against each other to control the land, to feed, and propagate.
Jerome Havre

Jérôme Havre proposes a fiber baroque sculpture exploring the use of power to create hierarchy. Referring to colonization, he associates artifacts of luxury with objects of war; he utilizes light and flames to reflect how behind power lays domination. Havre uses the underlying metaphor of The Enlightenment to examine how rational discourse can be used to justify                  violence and abuse when explained by the dominant.
In the exhibition, “Territorial Re-Marks,” each artist examines the conditions of control over territory. Havre’s sculptural installation considers the materiality of desire as illustrated through opulent objects – and how this desire for control can taint the reality of actions. Roz’s paintings reference our own underlying desires, and the impulses of survival that can fuel wild actions, even in the calmest of people. Dominion over these base impulses drives an internalization of territorial control. Lacombe’s visually striking wall installation expands the internal relationship inherent in reading and writing and exposes the insulated realm between the two. Smith transforms the internal and private realms of desire into publicly displayed architectural plans. Both Lacombe and Smith cross the boundaries between the hidden internal thoughts and methodologies expanding the territory of the mind to that of the physical world.
  

Join us this Friday for the Opening of Mark Masyga's solo exhibition

Mark Masyga

The Front Room is Proud to Present: 

Mark Masyga

September 14th—October 14th, 2012
Reception Friday, September 14th, 7-10
Fri–Sun 1-6 & by appointment


Front Room Gallery is proud to present a solo exhibition of paintings by Mark Masyga. This new series of work is informed by natural and man-made disasters and hovers indeterminately between landscape and abstraction. Mark Masyga embraces and incorporates the concept of the “Ruins Feeling” by Midas Dekkers, an emotion that occurs as a mixture of sadness, excitement and curiosity in the sight of decay. There is both an inevitability, and a beauty to decay, which Mark has captured in his paintings.

Mark MasygaMasyga’s under-painting and backgrounds contain forms that relate to vestiges of architecture and civilization turned to rubble. Building foundations of tone and form, Mark references deterioration and the natural de-evolution from order to disorder. This serves as a jumping-off point, as each painting develops, the composition is considered from every angle, producing a sense of disorientation and a feeling of the uncanny.

Masyga has long documented construction sites, commenting on their aesthetics and beauty along with their temporary nature. Mark sees the arrested development at these sites as an indicator of the economy’s near collapse, seeing the refuse and abandoned construction materials through the lens of ruins. However, Mark Masyga’s paintings neutralize feelings of nostalgia associated to ruination, abstracting this point reference, celebrating a fundamental loss of orientation.

The Summer Sampler at the Front Room!

On view through July 15th




Ross Racine
Emily Roz


Jeremy D Slater

Naval Cassidy

Julia Whitney Barnes

Kim Holleman

Stephen Mallon


Mark Masyga
Tom Rosenthal

Melissa Pokorny

Patricia Smith

Peter Fox


Sascha Mallon video still


Sascha Bezzubov and Jessica Sucher


Thomas Broadbent

Allan Packer

   

The Super Defense Force vs The Tittanno Beasts (Battle for Newtopia)


Get Ready for the Battle of the Century!! Join us Thursday (for Make Music New York!) and Friday evening for a multimedia experience.  Featuring Mark Stilwell's The Super Defense Force vs The Tittanno Beasts (Battle for Newtopia) and Brian Olin's Sound Performance.

Video Introduction for The Super Defense Force vs The Tittanno Beasts (Battle for Newtopia) 2012 Performance at the Front Room Gallery: a collaborative multimedia performance involving live experimental music in which giant monsters and robots created from cardboard and recycled materials, battle amongst the ruins of low income high rise buildings and a towering luxury condominium.

art by: Mark Stilwell and Chris Paisley
video by: Yoko Stilwell


Julia Whitney Barnes' Installation at S.P.A.R.C.

Julia Whitney Barnes unveils her latest installation, which incorporates mosaic techniques; ceramic reliefs are combined with glass fragments and reclaimed china pieces collected from the Brooklyn waterfront.  Collaborating with the members of the Sirovich Senior Center on 12th Street, Julia Whitney Barnes has created an impressive installation that reflects the eclectic nature of the East Village and the diversity of the members that enjoy the center.

RECEPTION: Saturday, June 23rd from 3-6pm



Performances tonight and tomorrow evening at the Front Room!


Front Room performances for Make Music NY:

"The Super Defense Force vs The Tittanno Beasts (Battle for
Newtopia)"

Thurs. June 21st and Fri. June 22nd, 8pm

The Super Defense Force vs The Tittanno Beasts (Battle for Newtopia),
is a collaborative multimedia performance involving live experimental
music in which giant monsters and robots created from cardboard and
recycled materials, battle amongst the ruins of low income high rise
buildings and a towering luxury condominium.

As in previous performaces, The Tittanno Beast vs The Super Defense
force, this over the top sequel delves into opposing forces such as
the rich vs the poor, life vs artificial life, and chaos vs order
acted out by characters inspired by Japanese pop cultural staples
such as giant robots and monsters.

Featuring works by: Mark Stilwell, John Mejias and Brian Olin

Summer Sampler Exhibition Opens This Saturday

Join us Saturday evening for the opening of "Summer Sampler"

"Summer Sampler"Opening Reception: Saturday, June 23rd , 7-9
June 23rd-July 15th, 2012



The Front Room Gallery is proud to present "Summer Sampler", a delectable delight for the eyes, featuring works by the last season's Front Room artists as well as a preview of the shows to come, and some splendid new selections. With works by: Thomas Broadbent, Peter Fox, Kim Holleman, Sascha Mallon, Stephen Mallon, Mark Masyga, Allan Packer, Melissa Pokorny, Ross Racine, Tom Rosenthal, Emily Roz, Jeremy Slater, Patricia Smith, Sasha Bezzubov and Jessica Sucher, and Julia Whitney Barnes. 

Thomas Broadbent's works on paper incorporate trompe l'oeil representations of seemingly unrelated objects and scenes, which allude to existentialistic ideas and create sophisticated associative meaning within each piece. His sensitivity to color, tactility, and structure propel these thoughts into reality, while maintaining a key tie to illusion and metaphor. 

Peter Fox's brilliantly colorful paintings use elements of Minimalism, OP art and Psychadelia. Fox spills paint onto the canvas, allowing chance and fluid dynamics a central role in shaping process and outcome. In his "Process" series Fox creates directed forms through composed accident, creating a visual structure that accumulates on the surface of each painting, developing a textural world of color that is drenched in abstraction. Entering a new arena of self-reflexive discourse, Fox has established a nuanced language, built from his vocabulary developed through his signature style of drip painting. 

Kim Holleman relates environmental issues of contamination of our natural resources, brought on by radioactive fallout, chemicals seeping into ground water, oil spills and the ephemera in our petro-chemical environment. She infers the impact of these elements and the increasing toll on our natural environment, presenting an installation of displays and scenes, colliding natural and artificial reality, both fantastical and frightening, into a curio collection gone awry. 

Sascha Mallon has developed a style of abstract storytelling that integrates narratives from unfiltered impressions of human interactions, society and history. Emotions and impulses are reconciled amongst her complex compositions; her drawings and video works are abundant in their signifiers and concealed references. 

Stephen Mallon's continuing photographic series, "American Reclamation", chronicles and examines recycling processes in the U.S. This series holds optimism in the innovation of salvaging techniques, showing the possible gains that can be made as industrial waste is revivified. Mallon's photographs often hit a deeply personal note as scenarios of subway cars sinking to the depths of the Atlantic, or airplanes driven on tractor-trailers through suburban New Jersey upend our notions of the status quo. 

Mark Masyga employs traditions of abstraction, color field, and hard edge painting techniques, creating considered compositions made up of stacked rectangular forms on tonal grounds. His paintings give abstracted order to impressions taken from the chaos of discarded construction materials at industrial sites. 

Allan Packer's extensive and impressive body of work examines elemental and cultural ideas, often referencing time and matter, and addressing our understanding of infinity. 

Melissa Pokorny’s new photo/collage/sculptural works reveal the extraordinary beauty hidden in the guise of the quotidian. Domestic objects gleaned from estate sales are combined with photographs and casts of utilitarian things—hammers, flashlights, pin cushions and coat hooks, to create evocative tableau that blur the boundaries between the domestic sphere and the natural world, the animate and the inanimate, the magical and the mundane, and remembered or invented memories of places and things. 

Ross Racine depicts realistic aerial views of fictional suburban communities, which amplify an awareness of modern choices in building and living styles. Racine employs common structural archetypes in his compositions, with an expanded view that exaggerates the rational utility of these imagined infrastructures. 

Tom Rosenthal's paintings create visual tension though an optical composition informed and composed from graphic sources. The colorful grid paintings draw inspiration from commonplace shapes and forms such as helvetica letters, corporate logos and chinese characters. Abstracted through repetition, these elements never quite lose their original place or meaning, yet still become something wholly different. 

Emily Roz investigates basic primitive directives of survival, with stunning depictions of wild animals in seemingly native habitats, revealed as illusion, with her insertion of domestic floral. These works display the incongruity within wild, natural impulses and the human desire to cultivate beauty through the propagation of plant-life. 

Jeremy D. Slater works with the ephemeral qualities and conditions of the environment, capturing the subtle, often elusive tones and tenor of our modern world. In his photographic series, “Fade,” Slater relates the transformative and devolutionary affects of time through a series of distressed wall advertisements, shot in Seoul, South Korea during his residency at Seoul Art Space_Geumcheon. 

Patricia Smith's meticulous, quietly subversive works commingle elements of architectural drawings, medical illustrations, and antique maps. Often labeled with text captions, these imaginary structures address the anxieties of contemporary life and the coping mechanisms that develop in the collective psyche. 

Sasha Bezzubov and Jessica Sucher have been collaborating since 2002, creating photographic series which bring a perspective of clarity to conflicts and present an empathetic vision to charged social and political issues. The boldness of their subject matter is portrayed in evoking, poetic photographs that are masterfully composed. Their recent series "Facts on the Ground," photographs taken in Israel/Palestine contemplates the effects of the senseless and seemingly unresolvable conflict. 

Julia Whitney Barnes's vivid, luminous paintings cull naturalistic imagery from an abstracted ground. These works are rooted simultaneously in science while evoking the fantastical. 

Second Friday Performances at The Front Room




Join us Friday, June 8th, from 7-9pm for 'Williamsburg Second Friday', featuring an evening of sound performances curated by Jeremy Slater, in conjunction with our current exhibition, "The Reefing of USS Radford," a solo exhibition of photographs by Stephen Mallon. Featuring: Zaïmph, Warren Ng and Band Antenna


Zaïmph is the solo project of ambient noise artist Marcia Bassett. Although legendary for white-hot guitar and vocal brutality, Zaimph's recent recordings and performances infuse cracked-raga song structures with dense electronic and synthesiser drones to create soundscapes where a lurking apocalypse is eclipsed by shimmering, meditative beauty.

Warren Ng is an experimental guitarist based in Brooklyn who draws from minimalism, drone, and noise.  He has performed and recorded under the names This Invitation, Somnambulists, and A Blanket of Snow.  His releases include: This Invitation's The Skin of Light (2004) and Sunless / Ellipses, Lapses, and Collapses (2010); and Somnambulists' At Daybreak the First Greyness to Emerge (2010) and The Invisible Score (2010). He also appeared on thecompilation Music for Plants (2005) and performed in Rhys Chatham's A Crimson Grail (for 200 Guitars) at Lincoln Center in 2009.

Band Antenna is a musical trio that has been channel surfing the outer frequencies for about 4 years. The Tribal Council of the Super Moon has utilized the Band Antenna to broadcast on their debut album. Band Antenna's "Super Moon Post" was released in March.



Stephen Mallon "The Reefing of USS Radford" Exhibition




The Front Room Presents:

Stephen Mallon

“The Reefing of USS Radford”

May 18–June 17th
Reception, Fri. May 18th, 7-9pm
Hours: Fri-Sun 1-6
 

The Front Room Gallery is Proud to present “The Reefing of USS Radford.” Stephen Mallon’s 3rd solo exhibition at The Front Room, this body of work is a continuation of his ongoing series “American Reclamation,”which chronicles and examines recycling processes in the U.S. This series holds optimism in the innovation of salvaging techniques, showing the possible gains that can be made as industrial waste is revivified. 

In the summer of 2010, American Marine Group (AMG) assumed responsibility of sinking the longest vessel ever reefed in the the Atlantic Ocean to date. 135 feet deep, and 28.5 nautical miles southeast of Cape May. 

563-feet in length, the USS Arthur W. Radford has nobly served her country for over 26 years as a US. Navy Spruance destroyer. Her impressive military background includes 10 deployments ranging from Venezuela, Panama, Argentina, Brazil, Senegal, Oman, Bahrain, the Azores, Nova Scotia, Italy and Turkey. Campaigns from Persian Gulf War, peace keeping operations off Lebanese coast, and finally retiring from her latest tour to battle in Operation Enduring Freedom makes her as decorated a hero as any Naval Admiral. 

This ship, once home to over 340 sailors at a single time, was given it’s last mission; to retire and become an underwater eco system to house algae, fish, anglers, and other under water life alike. Creating an underwater community not only for fish, but for divers as well. 

Stephen Mallon’s new series charts the final stages of this glorious vessel’s life and the destructive beauty of preparing it for reefing.